Blog

  • For me, the real promise of an Obama presidency is the promise of unity.

    We may not always agree, but working together to protect the lands we own in common — the lands that benefit so many in so many ways — can be very unifying work.

    I am also grateful for the new, collaborative leadership that President Obama has promised for Washington. I’m hopeful that style will extend to Congress as Washington attempts to address the many complex challenges in America’s future.

  • Every year, Cape Hatteras National Seashore Park is witness to a marvelous event that portrays life in all its majesty...the beginning of life itself.

    From May to November, birds such as the American Oystercatcher and reptiles like the Green Sea Turtle choose Cape Hatteras’ white sands as their nesting grounds. Green Sea Turtle nesting takes place during night at two to four-year intervals. It is also during nighttime that hatchlings emerge and waddle toward the sea.

  • In mid-October, I represented The Wilderness Society at the annual meeting of the Society of Environmental Journalists in Roanoke, Va. The conference included several sessions on global warming issues.

    It was no surprise that R.K. Pachauri, chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the Nobel-prizewinning panel whose report warned the world about the impacts of global climate change, had some sobering words for environmental journalists gathered there.

  • Tahoe National Forest, just northwest of California’s Lake Tahoe, is a place that refreshes the soul. Rugged beauty, quiet backcountry trails and the majestic Sierra Nevada Mountains all create a peaceful experience for visitors to cherish.

  • Getting outside the beltway is always a pleasure for someone who makes a living protecting America’s wild and beautiful places. It’s doubly rewarding when you have a chance to share an award with a government official and meet all kinds of people committed to the cause of conservation.

  • On a quiet hike in Clearwater National Forest, our Idaho Forests Campaign Manager John McCarthy stumbles upon some large animals whose kin have been known to charge a human or two.

    Read John’s account of his careful photographic tiptoe through moose territory:

    Two moose up Goose Creek
    And a photographer without a paddle

    By John McCarthy

    Walking up Goose Creek trail near the Idaho-Montana border on a sunny July morning, the sound of crunching brush told me something very large was beating the bushes — less than 50 feet above me.

  • This is the final installment of a four-part series on the beautiful, threatened Otero Mesa from New Mexico writer and Southwest Regional Office Administrative Assistant Zoe Krasney.

  • This is the third installment of a four-part series on the beautiful, threatened Otero Mesa from New Mexico writer and Southwest Regional Office Administrative Assistant Zoe Krasney.

  • Coming from Argentina as an intern to The Wilderness Society, I was recently asked this question while getting familiar with the work: Do you know who is in charge of managing most of the federal lands in the United States?

  • This is the second installment of a four-part series on the beautiful, threatened Otero Mesa from New Mexico writer and Southwest Regional Office Administrative Assistant Zoe Krasney.


    One of us spots something on the road, screaming “turtle”. As we discuss whether or not it is possible for a turtle to live in the desert, a truck roars by, then halts.

Pages