Idaho is home to some of the most rugged and remote wildlands in the U.S., but its forests, mountains, deserts and rivers are at risk due to mining, irresponsible off-road vehicle use, climate change and other threats.

We are working to protect the most pristine wildlands in Idaho, from the majestic rivers of the Clearwater Basin to the rich interconnected wildlife habitat of the High Divide. That work includes restoring and connecting large landscapes and fending off development in sensitive areas as well as irresponsible off-road vehicle use.

Areas of focus:

Idaho’s High Divide

Idaho’s High Divide connects the ecosystems of Central Idaho and Greater Yellowstone, offering wildlife a safe corridor to travel between the two areas. This connection also provides a buffer from the effects of climate change, increased off-road vehicle use and fragmented land management.

Clearwater Basin

The Clearwater Basin encompasses millions of acres of forests, rivers and mountains just south of Idaho’s northern panhandle, providing habitat for fish and wildlife and world-class recreation.

Owyhee Canyonlands

The Owyhee Canyonlands in southwest Idaho encompass one of the most remote and wild areas in the continental U.S. We are working to strengthen protections in effect in the area following wilderness designations in 2009.

Boulder-White Clouds

Designated as wilderness in 2015, Idaho’s Boulder-White Cloud is  a stunning mountain landscape supporting bighorn sheep, wolverines, pronghorn antelope, salmon and other wildlife.  We are working to ensure management of this area fully protects its wilderness values.

Help protect Idaho

We’re working to protect the most pristine of these wild Idaho lands, especially those that are the most important to wildlife and fish. The Wilderness Society needs your help in protecting these wild Idaho landscapes.


  • Jennifer Dickson

    Today, the Trump administration’s Bureau of Land Management (BLM) auctioned off parcels of federal public lands in southeastern Utah’s spectacular redrock country for oil and gas leasing and development. Included in BLM’s lease sale are approximately 54,000 acres of public lands near Bears Ears, Hovenweep and Canyons of the Ancients National Monuments, as well as in the culturally rich Alkali Ridge area of critical environmental concern and along the Green and San Juan rivers.

  • Andrea Alday

    Unfortunately, BLM’s latest draft closely mirrors prior attempts that a federal court found illegal. The draft plan once again inadequately protects areas with high conservation and cultural values and prioritizes off-road vehicles over other uses. It appears the agency has struck out when it comes to honoring its legal obligation to protect irreplaceable resources in the desert.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society will host a discussion for journalists working on energy, environment and climate issues on March 20 at the National Press Club. Panelists will focus on developments and trends from the last year and what that may portend for the year ahead.