Recreation Trails

America’s trails are a great way to experience nature, and there are hundreds of thousands of miles of them on our wildlands.

Why recreation trails

Trails are not only the way most people connect with nature, they also add to America’s outdoor recreation economy. We work to make sure trails are maintained and protected.

Keeping trails open

The hundreds of thousands of miles of trails on wildlands all need to be kept up. Not only do closed trails stop people from getting where they want to go, but they can harm surrounding lands and waters.

National Forest trails

Within our national forests are trails that allow people to connect with and experience nature. The US Forest Service is making outdoor recreation a higher priority.

Trails on Bureau of Land Management lands

Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands do not have many trails for hiking, horseback riding or bicycling. At Wilderness, we’re working to make trail recreation a priority for the BLM.

 

  • Some of the most important climate and energy achievements of the last eight years—including many that were Wilderness Society priorities—will be on the chopping block the moment President-elect Trump settles into the Oval Office. It will be more important than ever to stand up and let our lawmakers know what is important to us.

  • Thank you to the tens of thousands of you who responded to our requests to sign your name to a letter urging the administration to take this step. This is your victory!

  • Trump has picked a leading climate denier, Myron Ebell, to lead the transition team at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Ebell is also said to be in contention to head the agency itself. On the campaign trail, Trump said he may "cut" the EPA, but giving Ebell any authority over it may be just as bad.